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MEMOIRS WORTH READING THIS SPRING


Just as each new day is a new opportunity for change, each new book you read can be an incentive to do so. And is there a better time for you to boldly emerge into a new life than the spring in the announcement? Read to get inspired. And read it with love.


Girl Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen


In 1967 eighteen-year-old Susanna was sent into the McLean Hospital, known for its progressive methods and prominent clientele like Sylvia Plath, James Taylor, and Ray Charles. In her best-selling memoir, the author describes treatments at Massachusetts psychiatric facility after she was diagnosed with a borderline personality disorder. Susanna Kaysen dissects this world separate from everyday life, giving us an insight into her fellow patients of the institution in which she found herself, all in the context of the late 1960s. The book was published in paperback in June 1994 and was later transformed into a successful movie, released in 1999.


Becoming by Michelle Obama


The memoir of the former First Lady was published in 2018 as a deeply personal experience. A graduate of Princeton and Harvard Law School, Michelle Robinson Obama was an attorney when she met her future husband. In her memoir published in 2018, the former First Lady talks about the time spent in the White House but also opens about her roots, motherhood, and finding her voice in 24 chapters of deeply personal experience. A couple of days ago she announced that the book is now available in two new editions, a paperback and a special young readers' edition.


I Confess I Have Lived by Pablo Neruda


Internationally-acclaimed poet and a Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda, born in 1904, has been considered “el Poeta del pueblo” from an early age ­-­- his poem Enthusiasm and Perseverance was publish in 1917. Neruda died shortly after the coup in Chile, in 1973, while his I Confess I Have Lived has been published in 1974. The memoir of the previously adored Chilean poet has sparked many controversies, precisely one page of a book describing the rape of a maid, and the debates are fueled even after 40 years of publication. It is a book worth reading, now when the movement for demystifying Neruda and his work is getting stronger, led by the author and women's rights campaigner Isabel Allende.


Born a Crime by Trevor Noah


Born in Johannesburg in 1982, a comedian, writer, political commentator, and host of the American news program The Daily Show, had written his memoir named Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood. The autobiographical comedy book was published in 2016, describing his path from the apartheid to the desk of The Daily Show, and it all started with one criminal act: his birth. Trevor Noah wrote an affecting story about the origin, a struggle of a young man born to a white father and a black mother in times when such a relationship was forbidden.



By Myself by Lauren Bacall


A Hollywood diva who starred in movies such as The Big Sleep and Key Largo, in By Myself recalls the memory of her marriages with Bogart and Robards, talking about Sinatra ­also -­- Bacall called him a “piece of shit” after their infamously failed affair. A two-time Tony winner rose from the Bronx to Hollywood movie star, beginning her career in 1943 as a studio starlet. Lauren Bacall first published By Myself in 1978 ­-­- by adding 77 pages more she published a second volume called And Then Some, 25 years later. Subscribe to our mailing list, we help you develop your mindset for business.

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